1. Hydra Mission 2 complete. You can still get in on the action and join me in the #ShieldvsHydra fight for a chance to win weekly prizes, plus the Grand Prize - a trip to the #Avengers #AgeOfUltron premiere. http://goo.gl/iLSulS

    Hydra Mission 2 complete. You can still get in on the action and join me in the #ShieldvsHydra fight for a chance to win weekly prizes, plus the Grand Prize - a trip to the #Avengers #AgeOfUltron premiere. http://goo.gl/iLSulS

  2. Hail Hydra. Get in on the action and join me in the #ShieldvsHydra fight for a chance to win weekly prizes, plus the Grand Prize - a trip to the #Avengers #AgeOfUltron premiere. http://goo.gl/iLSulS

    Hail Hydra. Get in on the action and join me in the #ShieldvsHydra fight for a chance to win weekly prizes, plus the Grand Prize - a trip to the #Avengers #AgeOfUltron premiere. http://goo.gl/iLSulS

  3. Shall I add Ben-Hur and Me Before You to my ever-expanding list of books somehow related to Tom Hiddleston? Or is that premature?

  4. Inheritance - The New Yorker

    I’ve been distracted from writing posts about Edward St. Aubyn by my dad conscripting me into helping him copy-edit his book, which he is getting ready for publication. So to tide you over until I can write them, here is a recent New Yorker profile of St. Aubyn. He recently published a new novel, Lost for Words, which incidentally I’m currently reading aloud to my grandmother, because of that he’s had a lot of attention paid to him recently in print media.

  5. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T. S. Eliot            

    yaytomhiddlestonyay:

    tomhiddlestonslibrary:

    yaytomhiddlestonyay:

    tomhiddlestonslibrary:

    I should have been a pair of ragged claws

    Scuttling across the floors of silent seas.

    That’s how Tom Hiddleston makes us feel. He has mentioned on multiple occasions that The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot is his favorite poem.

    Oh my gosh, I’ve been sitting on theories upon theories about Tom’s feelings about this poem, but I haven’t quite felt at ease to muse in public about it yet…. Been really interesting thinking about it, though.

    I feel like I’d need to be a little more at ease with T. S. Eliot generally and his other work and his story. Plus, with lots of derivative (is that the word?) elements in his work, I’d want to also feel more at ease with other classic literature being referenced.

    Though I haven’t put down those thoughts yet, I enjoyed reading yours. Tom the Fascinating Human Being, you catalyse ongoing discussion and enrichment. :)

    That post was written by my sister, kieramanion, tagging her so she sees your compliment. I don’t know how to do whatever html witchcraft she did that make those tweets look so cool on the blog but unfortunately don’t show up in the dash. :P

    My focus in my posts so far has been “how I feel about these books” rather than “how I imagine Tom Hiddleston feels about these books,” but if you have some ideas in that vein, by all means share them! Don’t worry about having some kind of prerequisite knowledge. Some of the authors I’ve read for the blog, including Ballard and St. Aubyn, I knew absolutely nothing about before hearing about them from Tom and just diving into their work. Of course, if you want to do a bunch of research and then post your thoughts, that would be fun too.

    I think the word you mean is “references” instead of “derivative elements.” “Derivative” has a pretty negative connotation, sort of like plagiarism or lacking originality.

    Glancing quickly over the poem again I can spot a few references to Shakespeare. For instance, the phrase “dying fall” appears in the fourth line of Twelfth Night and “Prince Hamlet” is a reference to Hamlet (Captain Obvious, reporting for duty). We can both surely think of someone who loves Shakespeare a lot!

    Aha, yep, I did have a feeling ‘derivative’ has that connotation. Haha, Sorry to Mr Eliot. :P

    I think I saw a critique of the poem mentioning some sort of reference to Dante, as well? Got my work cut out for me if I really want to do it ‘hardcore’, haha. As you say though it can be lots of fun to do it at whatever level, however deep / less deep you want to go. :)

    Yes, the poem has an “epigraph” that is a quote from Dante’s Inferno in the original Italian. My sister included a link in her post to a cartoon that gives a translation of the quote. It’s really cool.

    "If I thought that my answer were given

    To one who would ever return to the world,

    This flame would be still, with no further quiver.

    But since, from this abyss,

    None has ever returned alive, if I hear true,

    Without fear of infamy, I answer you.”

    I haven’t read The Inferno, so I don’t know the exact context, but I assume from the drawings that it’s one of the souls in Hell speaking to Dante.

    Reblogged from: yaytomhiddlestonyay
  6. The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T. S. Eliot      

    yaytomhiddlestonyay:

    tomhiddlestonslibrary:

    I should have been a pair of ragged claws

    Scuttling across the floors of silent seas.

    That’s how Tom Hiddleston makes us feel. He has mentioned on multiple occasions that The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot is his favorite poem.

    Oh my gosh, I’ve been sitting on theories upon theories about Tom’s feelings about this poem, but I haven’t quite felt at ease to muse in public about it yet…. Been really interesting thinking about it, though.

    I feel like I’d need to be a little more at ease with T. S. Eliot generally and his other work and his story. Plus, with lots of derivative (is that the word?) elements in his work, I’d want to also feel more at ease with other classic literature being referenced.

    Though I haven’t put down those thoughts yet, I enjoyed reading yours. Tom the Fascinating Human Being, you catalyse ongoing discussion and enrichment. :)

    That post was written by my sister, kieramanion, tagging her so she sees your compliment. I don’t know how to do whatever html witchcraft she did that make those tweets look so cool on the blog but unfortunately don’t show up in the dash. :P

    My focus in my posts so far has been “how I feel about these books” rather than “how I imagine Tom Hiddleston feels about these books,” but if you have some ideas in that vein, by all means share them! Don’t worry about having some kind of prerequisite knowledge. Some of the authors I’ve read for the blog, including Ballard and St. Aubyn, I knew absolutely nothing about before hearing about them from Tom and just diving into their work. Of course, if you want to do a bunch of research and then post your thoughts, that would be fun too.

    I think the word you mean is “references” instead of “derivative elements.” “Derivative” has a pretty negative connotation, sort of like plagiarism or lacking originality.

    Glancing quickly over the poem again I can spot a few references to Shakespeare. For instance, the phrase “dying fall” appears in the fourth line of Twelfth Night and “Prince Hamlet” is a reference to Hamlet (Captain Obvious, reporting for duty). We can both surely think of someone who loves Shakespeare a lot!

    Reblogged from: yaytomhiddlestonyay
  7. As per request, I have added a Book List page to the blog. So far it only has books that I have posted about on the blog so far, and books I plan to post about on the blog in the immediate future. But I will continue to update it and make its scope much more extensive.

  8. Yes anon, I absolutely do plan on doing this. I’ve done a certain amount of research for this blog, including reading all of his twitter looking for book mentions. For now I will make I list of the things I’ve posted about so far. But your request has given me the necessary push to start working on writing up my more extensive research. Thank you. :)

  9. I added an about page to my blog, you guys. Check it out if want to read about what my blog is about.

  10. Hello, anon. Sorry I took a long time to answer this, hope you’re still around. For everyone else, I got this in response to my post about which books were in Tom’s tweet of a picture of a pile of JG Ballard books. Do you happen to know what they were, highrise-movie? There are two I can’t make out.

    If I were compiling a JG Ballard reading list, and let’s face it, I am, I would definitely add Crash and Empire of the Sun, because they have been made into famous film adaptations. highrise-movie also has a cool post about JG Ballard film adaptations. I didn’t know about the second two before.

    I would also add The Drought because it seems to be part of a kind of “trilogy” of three books including The Drowned World and The Crystal World which deal with different kinds of apocalyptic scenarios.

    Thanks a lot for your input, anon. Would you like to write me a post about Ballard? You definitely know more about him than I do at this point. So far I’ve only read High Rise and skimmed the wikipedia article about him. I plan to read more of his work, but it will take me some time to get around to posting more about him.

    I want to try to encourage all of you (my lovely followers) to send me your thoughts on any of the books I have posted about, or even anything I haven’t yet posted about, and I will post them on the blog. I’m only one person, and my posts aren’t that long, so there’s certainly more to say about any of the books I have written about.

    Here’s my current JG Ballard reading list:

    The books I can make out in Tom’s tweet:

    Concrete Island

    Cocaine Nights

    Rushing to Paradise

    The Atrocity Exhibition

    The Drowned World

    The Crystal World

    Millennium People

    Miracles of Life

    Added for reasons noted above:

    Empire of the Sun

    Crash

    The Drought

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